The future generations will learn much more than we’ll ever know. What world do we choose to leave our children?

Made with 👨‍🚀👩‍🚀 and 🚀🛰️ in San Francisco, CA, and Philadelphia, PA.

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©2019 by Starlight

THE CLIMATE IS CHANGING.

Here is what we are doing about it.

 

YOU AREN'T IN THIS ALONE

The world is mobilizing. The transition to a post-climate warming world will be the most capital-intensive transition in human history. Infrastructure investments alone need to reach at least $6 trillion per year until 2030 to deliver according to Inter-American Development Bank reports. More and better information is needed for financial markets, institutions and decision makers to appropriately manage risk, reduce lost, improve resilience, and allocate capital. We believe that geospatial data, including satellite and climate data can provide key elements of the information that is needed to evaluate impacts and opportunities.

THE RISKS ARE REAL

Small changes appearing today are exponential risks in waiting. East coast cities, western growing states, and southern plain areas are all reacting to increases in real world floods. Like so many of the impacts of climate change, when the landscape changes by small amounts, the real world outcome and impact is many magnitudes larger and accelerating. As the world climate becomes weirder and intensified, what may be quirky patterns today will be global transformations in supply chains, agriculture, and financial risks.

Fire

It all started when a Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) maintenance employee left a handyman pole leaning too close to an electric line, and a spark jumped into the unseasonably dry California wild grass and ignited. 

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Total destruction reached 153,000 acres within hours, and more than one-quarter of the $16.5 billion was not insured. After 114 years of operation, PG&E filed for bankruptcy within months, submerged by liabilities.

 

Storms

In a world of climate weirding, storms intensify and defy out of date models more often.


A truth nearly universal is that every pathway of weather, whether a tornado alley, jet stream, or high pressure zone, will be moving and colliding with geographic terrain. The twentieth century built high valued infrastructure, structures, and farmland in places now under recurring worry and risk by new weather.

 

PART I: MOBILIZE SCIENCE